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Chapter 16 Learning Objectives

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1. Review the prevalence and forms of sexual dysfunctions seen in men and women and discuss the approaches used by various health care providers to treat these types of disorders.


Textbook Reference: Sexual Disorders Are Common, pp. 517–520


2. Discuss the causes of and treatments for premature ejaculation.


Textbook Reference: Premature Ejaculation Is Men’s Number One Sex Problem, pp. 520–524


3. Outline the factors that can contribute to or cause delayed ejaculation.


Textbook Reference: Delayed Ejaculation Can Be a Side Effect of Several Drugs, p. 524


4. Provide a survey of the physical and psychological causes of erectile dysfunction.


Textbook Reference: Erectile Dysfunction Has Many Causes and Treatments, pp. 525–529


5. Review the various treatments that are available for erectile dysfunction and the situations in which they are indicated.


Textbook Reference: Erectile Dysfunction Has Many Causes and Treatments, pp. 525–529


6. Describe the symptoms, causes, and treatments for female sexual arousal disorder.


Textbook Reference: Female Sexual Arousal Disorder Involves Insufficient Genital Response, pp. 529–530


7. Discuss the possible causes and treatments of dyspareunia in men and women.


Textbook Reference: Sexual Pain is Uncommon in Men, p. 529; There Are Many Reasons for Sexual Pain in Women, pp. 530–532


8. Outline the prevalence and various treatments available for women who cannot, or have difficulty with, achieving an orgasm.


Textbook Reference: Difficulty in Reaching Orgasm Is Common Among Women, pp. 532–535


9. Survey the manifestations and causation of hypersexuality and, using research evidence, evaluate the proposition that hypersexuality is related to both addiction and obsessive–compulsive disorders.


Textbook Reference: Too Much Interest in Sex Can Cause Problems, pp. 535–537


10. Discuss the causes of low sexual desire in men and women and the various therapeutic approaches that have been devised to help with this problem.


Textbook Reference: Lack of Desire for Sex Is Not Necessarily a Problem, pp. 537–542


11. Discuss the newer perspective and theories that suggest a more encompassing approach to women’s sexual arousal than was common in the past.


Textbook Reference: Lack of Desire for Sex Is Not Necessarily a Problem, pp. 537–542


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