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Chapter 5 Learning Objectives

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1. Survey the classes of steroid hormones and discuss where they are produced, their main target tissues, and their primary hormonal effects in men and women.


Textbook Reference: Sex Steroids Consist of Three Groups, pp. 119–125


2. Describe the general mechanism and enzymatic actions by which steroid hormones are synthesized. Also, provide a summary of the discovery and manufacture of synthetic steroids.


Textbook Reference: Sex Steroids Consist of Three Groups, pp. 119–125


3. Outline the relationship between the hypothalamus and both the anterior and posterior pituitary in the synthesis and regulation of the hormones involved in reproduction.


Textbook Reference: Sex Steroids Consist of Three Groups, pp. 119–125; Proteins and Peptide Hormones Are Gene Products, pp. 125–128


4. Survey the classes of peptide/protein hormones and discuss where they are produced, their main target tissues, and their primary hormonal effects.


Textbook Reference: Proteins and Peptide Hormones Are Gene Products, pp. 125–128


5. Provide a complete survey of the reciprocal functional relationships between the brain and the testes, including a discussion of the regulation of both steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis.


Textbook Reference: A Brain–Pituitary–Testis Feedback Loop Controls Testicular Function, pp. 128–132


6. Summarize the ways natural and synthetic hormones can affect health and performance both negatively and positively.


Textbook Reference: A Brain–Pituitary–Testis Feedback Loop Controls Testicular Function, pp. 128–132; Sex Hormone–Related Compounds Exist In the Environment, pp. 148–149


7. Present a discussion of the views of different human societies toward menstruation and the effect of these views on women’s lives. Also, briefly review basic descriptive information about menstruation and methods that have been devised for dealing with the monthly flow.


Textbook Reference: Menstruation Has Biological and Social Aspects, pp. 132–135


8. Describe the phenomena of menstrual synchrony among women, and citing relevant studies, discuss the evidence against it.


Textbook Reference: The Menstrual Cycle Involves the Ovaries, Brain, Pituitary, and Uterus, pp. 136–145


9. Detail the endocrine and gonadal events leading up to ovulation and provide an explanation of how the brain regulates ovarian cyclicity.


Textbook Reference: The Menstrual Cycle Involves the Ovaries, Brain, Pituitary, and Uterus, pp. 136–145


10. Outline the structural and secretory changes that occur in the ovary, cervix, and uterus as the follicular phase of the cycle unfolds.


Textbook Reference: The Menstrual Cycle Involves the Ovaries, Brain, Pituitary, and Uterus, pp. 136–145


11. Detail the ovarian, uterine, and cervical changes associated with ovulation and the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.


Textbook Reference: The Menstrual Cycle Involves the Ovaries, Brain, Pituitary, and Uterus, pp. 136–145


12. Discuss the physical and psychological aspects of PMS and describe the treatments that have been shown to be effective in relieving the symptoms.


Textbook Reference: Menstrual Problems Are Common but Treatable, pp. 145–148


13. Outline the natural and pathological factors that can cause the irregularity or cessation of menstruation.


Textbook Reference: Menstrual Problems Are Common but Treatable, pp. 145–148


14. What is PMS and what is believed to cause it? What are the symptoms and how can they be alleviated?


Textbook Reference: Menstrual Problems Are Common but Treatable, pp. 145–148


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